Clonazepam (Klonopin)


5/21/2015
04:31 | Author: Thomas Carey
Clonazepam side effects
Clonazepam (Klonopin)

Clonazepam comes in tablets of 0.5, 1, and 2 milligrams (mg).

Serious side effects can occur. If you have any of these side effects, call your doctor right away or call 911:

Your dose of clonazepam will depend on the condition you have and your response to the drug.

Carefully remove dissolving tablets from the foil packaging.

If you miss a dose of clonazepam, take the missed dose as soon as you remember.

Clonazepam is also not a safe drug to take while breastfeeding. Talk to your doctor about other options if you're considering breastfeeding while taking clonazepam.

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If this occurs, it's dangerous to stop taking clonazepam suddenly. Stopping suddenly can cause withdrawal symptoms and a seizure.

Friends and family members should also be on the alert for any unusual changes in your behavior.

A: There are at least four different generic pharmaceutical manufacturers of clonazepam (Klonopin). Each of them makes tablets of a different color. The FDA must certify that any generic drug it approves is bioequivalent to the original patented drug, which means the drug must act within the body in the same manner. Therefore, it's most likely that your two different tablets are bioequivalent and have simply been made by different manufacturers. If you have any doubt that these aren't both the same drug, show the actual tablets to a pharmacist, who can verify by checking them visually.

Clonazepam is a controlled substance because it’s possible for people to abuse the drug or become dependent on it.

Until you know how clonazepam affects you, don’t drive or operate machinery.

Overdose of clonazepam can cause sleepiness, confusion, diminished reflexes, and coma.

You can browse Drugs A-Z for a specific prescription or over-the-counter drug or look up drugs based on your specific condition. This information is for educational purposes only, and not meant to provide medical advice, treatment, or diagnosis. Remember to always consult your physician or health care provider before starting, stopping, or altering a treatment or health care regimen.

A: There are at least four different generic pharmaceutical manufacturers of clonazepam (Klonopin). Each of them has a different-colored tablet. The United States FDA must certify that any generic drug approved by them is bioequivalent to the original patented drug. This means that the drug must act within the body in the same manner. Therefore, it is most likely that your two different colored tablets are bioequivalent and just made by different manufacturers. You did not list the numbers on the tablets. The orange clonazepam 0.5 mg that I viewed had a C05 listed underneath the APO on the tablet. If you have any doubt that the tablets are not the same drug, please show the actual tablets to a pharmacist to visually verify.

Clonazepam comes in regular and dissolving tablets.

Don’t double your dose to make up for the missed one.

Other side effects of clonazepam may include:

Always l your doctor if you have allergies to any medications, including other benzodiazepines.

Clonazepam works by increasing the effects of GABA, a neurotransmitter that moderates the movement of nerve signals in the brain.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved clonazepam in 1975 under the brand name Klonopin for the Roche drug company. Many companies now make generic clonazepam.

Research has not shown whether clonazepam is safe and effective in treating panic attacks in anyone younger than 18. People older than 65 should also take clonazepam with caution.

After you start clonazepam, it's important to let your doctor know if you have any thoughts of harming yourself or any unusual changes in mood or behavior, like panic attacks, restlessness, agitation, or depression.

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Common brand names for benzodiazepines include Valium, Xanax, Librium, Dalmane, and Ativan. Clonazepam can interact with many medications, so make sure your doctor is aware of all medicines you take.

You should take clonazepam only exactly as directed by your doctor.

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A: Klonopin (clonazepam) ( /drugs/klonopin ) is a benzodiazepine that affects chemicals in the brain. Klonopin is indicated for anxiety. Common side effects associated with clonazepam include drowsiness, dry mouth, dizziness, and weight changes. Clonazepam can be habit-forming and should only be taken as the doctor prescribes. Do not take more clonazepam than what is prescribed by the doctor. If clonazepam is not controlling the anxiety, please consult with your doctor. ( /emotional-health/anxiety/index.aspx ). It is also important when your doctor prescribes a new medication, be sure to discuss all your prescription medications and over-the-counter drugs, including dietary supplements, vitamins, botanicals, minerals and herbals, as well as foods you eat. Always keep a current list of the drugs and supplements you take and review it with your health care providers and your pharmacist. If possible, use one pharmacy for all your prescriptions and over-the-counter products. This allows your pharmacist to keep a complete record of all your prescription drugs and advise you about drug interactions and side effects. For more specific information, consult with your doctor or pharmacist for guidance based on your health status and current medications, particularly before taking any action. Kimberly Hotz, Pharm? ?

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Taking more clonazepam than prescribed by your doctor may increase the risk for dependence.

Other conditions your doctor needs to know about before prescribing clonazepam include:

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Clonazepam is the generic form of the brand-name drug Klonopin, prescribed to treat seizures and panic attacks.

Before taking clonazepam, l your doctor if you are pregnant or may become pregnant. If you become pregnant while on clonazepam, l your doctor right away.

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In 2011 alone, there were 76,557 emergency room visits resulting from the abuse or misuse of clonazepam, an increase of 122 percent from 2004.

Clonazepam may interact with many other drugs that work in your brain and nervous system., including:

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By Chris Iliades, MD, and Mary Elizabeth Dallas| Medically Reviewed by Farrokh Sohrabi, MD.

A: This is definiy a question to pose to your physician. Clonazepam can cause psychological and physical dependence and is often abused. The risk of abuse and dependence is greater for those taking high clonazepam doses for long periods of time (more than a few weeks). Because clonazepam can cause dependence, you should not suddenly stop taking clonazepam without first discussing it with your health care provider. If the medication is working for you, then under the supervision of your physician you should continue taking it. Your physician will work with you, if you decide to switch to another medication, in coming off clonazepam slowly and safely. Lori Mendoza, PharmD Poulin, PharmD.

It’s very important to let your doctor know about all drugs you take, including illegal drugs, over-the-counter (OTC) drugs, and any herbs or supplements.

About one in 500 people taking medications like clonazepam develop suicidal thoughts, usually within a week of starting treatment.

Clonazepam may make you feel drowsy and may affect your judgment.

Clonazepam may increase your risk for suicidal thoughts and behavior.

Make sure your hands are dry, and don’t push tablets through the foil. Put these tablets on your tongue right away.

Common Conditions.

If an overdose occurs, call a poison control center at.

Clonazepam has many side effects. The most common ones in people treated for seizures are drowsiness, ataxia (a type of clumsiness), and behavior changes. Let your doctor know about any side effects.

Don't drink alcohol while taking clonazepam.

You’ll most likely take clonazepam one to three times a day at about the same time. You can take it with or without food.

Clonazepam belongs to a class of drugs called benzodiazepines.

A child’s dose to treat seizures depends on weight.

You also may not be able to take clonazepam if you have severe liver disease.

A: Your question regarding the drug interaction of sulindac (Clinoril) and /drugs/sulindac Klonopin (clonazepam). /drugs/klonopin. According to a drug interaction report performed by Lexi-Comp, there are no interactions found. Jen Marsico, RPh.

A typical adult dose to treat panic disorder may start at 0.25 mg twice a day. After three days, your doctor may increase the dose to 1 mg a day.

If it’s almost time for your next regular dose, however, skip the missed dose.

You should not take clonazepam if you have untreated open-angle glaucoma, so l your doctor about any eye symptoms you experience.

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Withdrawal symptoms may include hallucinations, shaking, cramps, anxiety, sweating, and difficulty sleeping.

Once you have been on clonazepam for a significant length of time, there is some chance you will become dependent on the drug.

Alcohol may increase your risk of experiencing some of the side effects of clonazepam.

Don’t suddenly stop taking clonazepam on your own because this can cause withdrawal symptoms.

Your doctor will start you at a low dose and increase your dose until you have a good response. This may take a few weeks.

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If you or someone else has symptoms of an overdose, call 911.

Many drugs may affect the way clonazepam works, and clonazepam may affect other drugs you are taking.

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A: Klonopin (clonazepam) is a benzodiazepine that is used to treat anxiety and panic disorders. According to the package insert, it has a half-life of 30-40 hours. The half-life represents the time it takes the body to reduce the amount of clonazepam by half. Thus, after 2 half-lives approximay 75% of the drug is out of the body and so on. Some drugs, however, remain in fat cells or skin and hair cells longer. Michelle McDermott, PharmD.

A: Clonazepam belongs to a class of drugs called benzodiazepines that affects chemicals in the brain. It is used primarily to treat anxiety disorders and seizures. Clonazepam may also be used to treat restless leg syndrome and social phobias. Common side effects of clonazepam include dizziness, drowsiness, depression, mood changes, muscle weakness, memory problems, lack of balance, nausea, and blurred vision. Clonazepam can cause side effects that impair your thinking and reactions. So, use caution when doing anything that requires alertness. This is not a complete list of side effects that can occur with clonazepam. Clonazepam may be habit-forming, meaning that it is possible to become physically or mentally dependent on this medication. Because of this, clonazepam is only intended to used for a short period of time, generally no longer than 9 weeks. When clonazepam is used long-term, withdrawal side effects are more likely when it is stopped. So, do not suddenly stop taking clonazepam. To avoid withdrawal side effects, it may be necessary to taper the dose or slowly decrease the dose over time. This should only be done under the supervision of your doctor. Your doctor is best able to guide your treatment decisions based on your specific circumstances. Sarah Lewis, PharmD.

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A typical adult dose to treat seizures may start at 1.5 mg a day, divided into three doses. Your doctor may gradually increase your dose to a maximum daily dose of 20 mg.

Clonazepam is dangerous to take during pregnancy. There is evidence that clonazepam may increase the risk for birth defects if you take them while pregnant.

A: Klonopin (clonazepam) in a class of drugs called benzodiazepines. Clonazepam affects chemicals in the brain that can become unbalanced and cause anxiety. Clonazepam is commonly used to treat seizure disorders, panic disorders, and other conditions. According to the Food and Drug Administration-approved drug information, the most common side effects of clonazepam are: clumsiness, constipation, cough, dizziness, drowsiness, dry mouth, headache, increased saliva production, loss of appetite, and muscle aches. Stopping clonazepam abruptly can cause severe withdrawal symptoms, including seizures. Clonazepam can interact with other medications. When your doctor prescribes a new medication, be sure to discuss all your prescription and over-the-counter drugs, including dietary supplements, vitamins, as well as the foods you eat. Always keep a current list of the drugs and supplements you take and review it with your health care providers and your pharmacist. If possible, use one pharmacy for all your prescription medications and over-the-counter products. This allows your pharmacist to keep a complete record of all your prescription drugs and to advise you about drug interactions and side effects. If you would like to submit another question, return to Everyday Health. Burton Dunaway, PharmD.

A: According to the package insert, Klonopin (clonazepam) may cause changes in weight for some people. Clonazepam may cause anorexia or increased appetite. All medications can affect different people in different ways. It is important to discuss any problems you may be having with your medications with your healthcare provider. Please see the following Everyday Health link for more information on Clonazepam (Klonopin). /drugs/clonazepam Laura Cable, PharmD.


Clonazepam side effects