Epilepsy



Epilepsy

11/28/2015
11:30 | Author: Nathan Leman
Epilepsy
Epilepsy

Epilepsy is a group of neurological diseases characterized by epileptic seizures. Epileptic seizures are episodes that can vary from brief and nearly undetectable.

Tonic-clonic seizures occur with a contraction of the limbs followed by their extension along with arching of the back which lasts 10–30 seconds (the tonic phase). A cry may be heard due to contraction of the chest muscles, followed by a shaking of the limbs in unison (clonic phase). Tonic seizures produce constant contractions of the muscles. A person often turns blue as breathing is stopped. In clonic seizures there is shaking of the limbs in unison. After the shaking has stopped it may take 10–30 minutes for the person to return to normal; this period is called the " postictal state " or "postictal phase." Loss of bowel or bladder control may occur during a seizure.

Epilepsy Causes, Symptoms and Treatments

10/27/2015
10:20 | Author: Sydney Birch
Epilepsy
Epilepsy Causes, Symptoms and Treatments

Learn all about epilepsy - recurrent seizures which occur because of a sudden surge of electrical activity in the brain. Read all about the causes.

Epilepsy in UK - according to Epilepsy Action 460,000 people in the United Kingdom have epilepsy.

There are three types of diagnoses a doctor might make when treating a patient with epilepsy:

The main symptoms of epilepsy are repeated seizures. There are some symptoms which may indicate a person has epilepsy. If one or more of these symptoms are present a medical exam is advised, especially if they recur:

Article last updated on Thu 31 December 2015. Visit our Epilepsy category page for the latest news on this subject, or sign up to our newsletter to receive the latest updates on Epilepsy.

Epilepsy Information Page National Institute of Neurological

12/29/2015
12:40 | Author: Sydney Birch
Epilepsy
Epilepsy Information Page National Institute of Neurological

Epilepsy and Seizure Disorders information page compiled by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS).

Epilepsy can be a life-threatening condition. Some people with epilepsy are at special risk for abnormally prolonged seizures or sudden unexplained death in epilepsy.

Disorders A - Z News From NINDS Funding Information Research Programs.

NIH...Turning Discovery Into Health.

Prepared by: Office of Communications and Public Liaison National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke National Institutes of Health Bethesda, MD 20892.

Last Modified February 1, 2016.

NINDS health-related material is provided for information purposes only and does not necessarily represent endorsement by or an official position of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke or any other Federal agency.

Overview - Epilepsy

3/20/2015
03:50 | Author: Thomas Carey
Epilepsy
Overview - Epilepsy

Epilepsy is a central nervous system disorder (neurological disorder) in which nerve cell activity in the brain becomes disrupted, causing.

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What Is Epilepsy? Epilepsy Foundation

5/22/2015
05:30 | Author: Gabriel Macduff
Epilepsy
What Is Epilepsy? Epilepsy Foundation

Epilepsy is a chronic disorder, the hallmark of which is recurrent, unprovoked seizures. Many people with epilepsy have more than one type of seizure and may have other symptoms of neurological problems as well. In these situations, their condition can be defined as a specific.

A person is diagnosed with epilepsy if they have one or more seizures that were not caused by some known and reversible medical condition like alcohol withdrawal or extremely low blood sugar. The seizures in epilepsy may be related to a brain injury or a family tendency, but often the cause is compley unknown. The word "epilepsy" does not indicate anything about the cause of the person's seizures or their severity.

Learn more about the ILAE at www.ilae.org.

Epilepsy is a chronic disorder, the hallmark of which is recurrent, unprovoked seizures. Many people with epilepsy have more than one type of seizure and may have other symptoms of neurological problems as well.

After a consensus process involving international medical professionals and public comment, the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) published a new definition for epilepsy. Dr. Robert Fisher, leader of the ILAE task force and former editor-in-chief of, discusses the new definition in the editorial, " A Revised Definition of Epilepsy. ".

The human brain is the source of human epilepsy. Although the symptoms of a seizure may affect any part of the body, the electrical events that produce the symptoms occur in the brain. The location of that event, how it spreads and how much of the brain is affected, and how long it lasts all have profound effects. These factors determine the character of a seizure and its impact on the individual.

Sometimes EEG testing, clinical history, family history and outlook are similar among a group of people with epilepsy. In these situations, their condition can be defined as a specific epilepsy syndrome.

Here are some key numbers (in Tweet-size bites) to talk about it!

Having seizures and epilepsy also can also affect one's safety, relationships, work, driving and so much more. How epilepsy is perceived or how people are treated (stigma) often is a bigger problem than the seizures.